>Brookings Oregon News, Sports, & Weather | The Curry Coastal Pilot

News Classifieds Web
web powered by Web Search Powered by Google

News arrow News arrow Business arrow FRIENDS OF HOME HEALTH & HOSPICE SEEK DONATIONS

FRIENDS OF HOME HEALTH & HOSPICE SEEK DONATIONS Print E-mail
February 19, 2008 11:00 pm

By Marjorie Woodfin

Pilot staff writer

Friends of Home Health & Hospice, organized in December 2006 as an independent nonprofit foundation serving Curry County, is currently seeking donations to fund the training for a county wound nurse and to purchase a desperately needed van.

Board members Ted and Betty Lonien and Pat Piper met with Patty Slagle, Curry County Home Health and Hospice Volunteer and resource coordinator, this week to discuss plans for the future.

Home Health provides skilled care to individuals in their place of residence, emphasizing restoring of health or minimizing effects of disability or illness.

Hospice provides compassionate care and support for those who have received a life-ending diagnosis and cure is no longer a realistic goal. Services are delivered wherever the person calls home in the endeavor to allow individuals to live life to its fullest and maintain dignity throughout the journey. The hospice team provides physical, spiritual, emotional social support, with care available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Friends, as an independent foundation, is able to receive living trusts, endowments, properties and other assets, and to assist donors in realizing the optimum tax position.

"We have assets such as homes from estates that do not want the assets to go to the county, but want them held for the needs of hospice and home care needs," Betty Lonien explained.

Because the foundation is a fledgling organization, it is not equipped to handle all the accounting and legal requirements for estate donations and has joined the Oregon Community Foundation for that assistance.

The board members and Slagle explained some of the needs that are currently being met by the Friends. An example might be a case when medical bills for extended hospice care may be $10,000 and insurance will only cover $8,000. Friends can reimburse the $2,000 to the county.

There is no tax money or help from Medicare, Medicaid, or insurance for some hospice care. Bereavement support is not covered. Hospice has a team of bereavement counselors to provide bereavement support for schools when a student or teacher dies, as well as for individual patients and caregivers.

Massage treatment is not covered by insurance. Slagle explained that massage by a licensed massage therapist, both for the patient and caregiver, decreases pain level and alleviates stress.

They explained the need for a wound nurse because there is not one wound nurse in Curry County. "A wound nurse, working with the patient's physician, can determine all needs for meds, nutrition, psycho-social needs, and best treatment for wound and patient," Slagle explained. "It's a specialty needed in the Brookings-Harbor community where we have a large age group of those needing the care, including diabetics and those with bedsores and other significant wounds that won't heal," she added.

The wound nurse will complete training and receive her certificate in late March, ready to serve patients in Curry County.

"Right now we need money to purchase a van," Ted Lonien said. "The van owned by Friends is old and decrepit, and it's dangerous," Slagle explained. "We need the truck to transport all of tons of rummage that fills the fairgrounds in August," she added.

"The van needed is a big box truck, 16 to 10 feet, with a lift gate to haul the thousands of donations that will fill 30,000 feet of space at the fairgrounds," Lonien added.

"This is our ninth year," Slagle said. "It's an amazing thing. It has grown from a few volunteers and five tables of rummage to something this big with more than 200 volunteers and people coming from as far away as Canada. It takes all of us to do it."

In the meantime, Friends are looking for support for their next fundraiser, selling hot dogs at the craft area at the Azalea Festival.

The Brookings office of Home Health & Hospice is at 306 Wharf St., the corner of Hemlock. Slagle noted that two-thirds of the clients are from Brookings-Harbor.

For additional information phone Friends President Betty Lonien, (541) 412-8016. Donations cam be mailed to P.O. Box 348, Gold Beach, OR 97444.

 

Business News by Yahoo Finance

  • Fed debates merits of earlier rate hike given U.S. jobs gains
    Federal Reserve hinted on Wednesday that a surprisingly strong jobs market recovery could lead it to raise interest rates earlier than it had been anticipating. At the same time, most Fed officials wanted further evidence before changing their view on when rates should rise, according to the minutes from the central bank's July 29-30 meeting. "Labor market conditions had moved noticeably closer to those viewed as normal in the longer run," the minutes said, adding that policymakers "generally agreed" the job market was healing faster than they had expected. The Fed had said in its policy statement following the July meeting that there was "significant" labor market slack, but the minutes showed many members of its policy-setting panel thought this characterization "might have to change before long."
  • BofA in $16.5 billion deal with U.S. over mortgage bonds: source
    Bank of America Corp is expected to pay more than $16.5 billion to end investigations into mortgage securities that the bank and its units sold in the run-up to the financial crisis, in a deal that could be announced as early as Thursday, a person familiar with the matter said. An agreement in principle was reached earlier this month after a phone call between the bank's chief executive, Brian Moynihan, and Attorney General Eric Holder. Representatives of the Justice Department and Bank of America declined comment.
  • Dow, S&P 500 rise after Fed minutes reassure on rates
    The minutes were from the two-day meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee in late July, when the Fed trimmed its monthly bond-buying program by an additional $10 billion. Stocks pared gains immediately after the release of the minutes, but the Dow and the S&P 500 returned to positive territory with a little more than an hour of trading left in the regular session. "The market was absolutely being driven by the Fed. It started out strongly, then it looked like a bit of capitulation before the statement came out, and then we obviously saw a big sigh of relief," said Drew Wilson, an equity analyst at Fenimore Asset Management in Cobleskill, New York. The S&P 500 gained 4.91 points, or 0.25 percent, to finish at 1,986.51.

Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Twitter

© Copyright 2001 - 2014 Western Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. By Using this site you agree to our Terms of Use