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English Village spotlighting local artisans

The English Village at the corner of Highway 101 and Benham Lane is undergoing a transformation that will allow a number of entrepreneurs to present art, crafts, collectibles, antiques, and property, as well as beauty care at the HairPort Beauty Salon.

Karen Clark, left, and Louise Shaw display their creations at English Village.
Karen Clark, left, and Louise Shaw display their creations at English Village. Photo by Majorie Woodfin
Rosie Dieter, who with her husband David and partner Georgia Alexander Poole, owns the English Village, is on a mission to provide a show place for artists in all media, from original oils to crocheted creations and everything in between, to be presented in the best possible setting.

Dieter’s Blue Chip Collectibles shop offers antiques, collectibles, gifts, and vintage jewelry and clothing. She also has plans for a special space in what she will call, “Heart for Art,” to provide space for artists to show and sell, including leased hanging space, executive space, and consignment opportunities.

Rosie, who enjoys art classes with Audie Stanton, said, “Once into art, you see things in a different way. We’re in such beautiful place. This is my plan and purpose in life, the reason I was brought to Brookings, to help other people.”

She said that she and David came to Brookings from Las Vegas after seeing a photo of Harris Beach in a Forbes Magazine.

However, Rosie’s priority is Blue Chip Properties, her real estate office. With a masters in business administration and more than 40 years of business experience, plus help from her husband, Rosie is determined to make the English Village a special place that will draw buyers and sellers, tourists and residents. She said her husband of 48 years retired to help her – and fish.  “He’s my ‘main man.’ I couldn’t do it without him,” she said.

According to Louise Shaw of Shaw’s Retreat, who manages the village, the concept is “shops plus more shops with individual owners working together for fun and positive results.”

Shaw’s Retreat features arts and crafts from crafters well known in Brookings Harbor, including Shaw’s mother, Helen Wigginton, better known as “Wiggie” and Mary Pfremmer, another popular crafter.

The Retreat is filled with Shaw’s, Wiggie’s, Mary’s, and other crafters’ popular handmade aprons, towels, and other items, plus consignment furniture, dishes, crafts, mouse pads, puzzles, and posters.

Karen Clark’s Rustic Lady is filled with antiques, collectibles, vintage jewelry and clothing, pieces of hand-crafted furniture, special order decorative carpets, CKK photos

From Rustic Lady, shoppers can wander into Debra Wells’ Garden Swing to look at gifts, collectibles, plants and garden accessories, candles, jewelry, jams, seasonings, books, baskets, potpourri, and home décor items of all kinds.

Visitors will also find a few special pieces from Oscar winning movie producer Elmo Williams’ collection in the shops, including an old English chest of drawers, dated 1721, that is currently on display at Rustic Lady.

“We help each other,” said Clark, who was on duty in her shop and covering Wells’ shop.

In the middle of the shops is HairPort, Lori Hughes’ beauty salon that has been a tenant in the village longer that any of the other shops.

The shopkeepers are all making plans for Yard Sale Saturday, Saturday, April 25, and the English Village Sidewalk and Parking Lot Sale to be held the following day, Sunday, April 26. Space is available for $15 for anyone who would like to be included in the sale on Sunday.

“We will also be having a Grand Opening and Mothers’ Day Sale, May 2 and 3,” Shaw said.

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