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Emerald Coast Estates changes hands

Six years after opening the 19-acre Emerald Coast Estates manufactured home park in Harbor, the Itzen family has sold the property to Roy and Judy Lindsey, of Fallbrook, Calif.

The new name of the development will be Emerald Coast Estates MHP, LLC., Dave Itzen said.

“The Lindsey’s are long time successful and experienced owners and operators of manufactured home parks, and we are certain they will continue to operate the development as the first-class community we worked hard to build,” Itzen said.

The Itzen family had previously offered Emerald Coast Estates to the residents of the development and assisted them in analyzing a possible purchase with several different professional companies specializing in that area, he said.

However, the residents ultimately decided not to purchase the development and the Itzen family listed the development for sale on the open market, he said.

The decision to sell was not an easy one.

“The Itzen family’s philosophy in developing Emerald Coast Estates was to do more than just build a development,” Itzen said. “Our vision was to create a community that would fit the lifestyle of residents “55 and better,” and also create an environment in which residents would be proud to live.”

Today the gated community, which opened in 2004, features a “state of the art” community center, indoor heated swimming pool, and professionally designed and installed water feature.

Itzen said Emerald Coast Estates “is considered to be one of the best of its class in the Pacific Northwest.”

“We wish the residents and Mr. and Mrs. Lindsey continued success,” he said.

The Lindseys have managed mobile home parks for more than 15 years, said Roy Lindsey. The couple recently sold a mobile home park in California and continue to own one in Apple Valley, Calif., he said.

“We’ve been looking to buy another park outside of California for three years,” Lindsey said.

The couple learned of Emerald Coast Estates when checking a website that lists mobile and manufacturing parks for sale. They traveled to Brookings to check it out.

“Emerald Coast is a unique property, not like your ordinary mobile home park,” Lindsey said. “It is state of the art, clean and we like how well it was developed. It looks and feels like a residential area not a mobile home park.”

Future plans for the park include placing manufactured homes on remaining empty lots within the subdivision and put them up for sale, he said.

“We’re planning to move to Brookings in a few years,” Lindsey said.

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