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DRURY'S GRIPS GO WORLD WIDE

A golf grip marketed by Patrick Drury of Brookings is now being manufactured and marketed world wide.

Following successful negotiations, the grip which was marketed by Drurys Down Pat Golf Co. of Brookings, owner of the patent will be marketed and manufactured by Royal Grip Corp., a world-wide company, Drury said.

The equipment to be marketed by the international firm is the Green Fix Putter Grip, a grip that has a pop-up device that repairs the ball divot on golf course greens.

His venture in marketing the Green Fix grip began in 1997 when he was offered the sole rights to manage and market three patented golf products in the U.S. by designer and Canadian golf professional Terry Wiens.

Drury, being fairly well connected in the golf industry and Professional Golfers Association tours, set out to launch the new Green Fix Putter Grips.

Down Pat Golf Co. was formed to set up a business plan, logo and anything connected to marketing the grips, Drury said. It also involved a team of representatives to market test the product.

The putter grip was debuted and demonstrated with high reviews for about eight months, Drury said.

He then took the product to the golf industry and the PGA tours. With support from Ray Carrasco, a tour player from Southern California, Drury and Wiens gained U.S. Golf Association, Greenkeepers and industry market experts approval.

The product was later debuted by Lee Trevino, Larry Nelson, Gary McCord and Bobby Grace, Drury said.

Upon gathering interest from Danny Edwards and the Royal Grip Co., negotiations began and have now been finalized, to market and manufacture the grip, Drury said.

Although Drury can sit back and collect the royalties on his product, he is not going to be idle, he said.

He is now focusing on another golf related venture, which at this point in time would not be disclosed, Drury said. He would say that he will employ local people once the venture goes public.

In addition to golf, Drury operates a construction business in Brookings.

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