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DODGEN NOW PRACTICES PHYSICAL THERAPY IN HARBOR

The staff at Active Life Physical Therapy in Harbor includes Pat Van Ooyen, Patrick Dodgen, Julie Moerke and Kristin Morris. (The Pilot/Ellen Babin).
The staff at Active Life Physical Therapy in Harbor includes Pat Van Ooyen, Patrick Dodgen, Julie Moerke and Kristin Morris. (The Pilot/Ellen Babin).

By Ellen Babin

Pilot staff writer

A large, heated, indoor, private swimming pool is one of the healing tools used by the Active Life Physical Therapy Center located in the Brookings-Harbor Shopping Center in Harbor.

Formerly Pacific Northwest Physical Therapy, the Active Life Physical Therapy Center continues to offer "high quality, caring, hands-on therapy," according to its new owner Patrick Dodgen, MS, PT.

Dodgen, who has 20 years experience, explains that his office specializes in total joint-replacement therapy.

"My desire is to help you reach your goals and return to a healthier, active life. I hope that you will feel cared for as you receive beneficial treatment and are given tools to assist you in maintaining and furthering your progress."

Dodgen was the owner of Crescent City Physical Therapy for seven years. His wife and family have lived in Brookings for nine years.

He gained experience in a variety of settings including hospital, home health, outpatient orthopedic clinics and injured worker centers.

He was an instructor at Southwestern Oregon Community College for two years.

Dodgen's staff includes Julie Moerke, who has six years experience as a physical therapy assistant.

His wife Susan Dodgen is his office manager. Pat Van Ooyen is his receptionist and Kristin Morris is a physical therapy aid and patient care coordinator.

For information, phone (541) 412-1155.

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