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DANIELS NEW OWNERS OF HUNGRY CLAM

Roy and Kristi Daniels, formerly of Redding, Calif., have expanded the restaurant's hours and menu. (The Pilot/Ellen Babin).
Roy and Kristi Daniels, formerly of Redding, Calif., have expanded the restaurant's hours and menu. (The Pilot/Ellen Babin).

By Ellen Babin

Pilot staff writer

The Hungry Clam restaurant has made hungry people happier.

With new owners, the eatery in the Port of Brookings Harbor now is open daily for lunch and dinner.

Former Redding residents Kristi and Roy Daniels bought the place because they liked the food; the Hungry Clam was always on the to-do list when the couple vacationed in the area three times a year.

Added to the otherwise unchanged menu are scallops "to die for," the new owners said; crab melt sandwiches and shrimp and crab melt sandwiches, fruit cups, and hushpuppies.

The three children of the former owner, Joan Konzak, are still on staff to continue the tradition of "having the best seafood in town," Kristi Daniels said.

The line of waiting diners stretching outside the door will be moving faster because of added staff and new equipment in the kitchen, she explained. Take-outs are welcome too.

The seafood restaurant now allows customers to pay with VISA, Master Card or checks from anywhere.

To keep the restaurant a family place, alcoholic beverages will not be served. But "Fred" the sea gull will still make appearances.

Kristi and Roy Daniels (he is a self-employed trucker) say they have never met nicer people than in Brooking and wonder "Did every single nice person move here?"

The Hungry Clam is open seven days a week until 7 p.m. It opens at 11 a.m. Mondays through Thursdays and opens at 10 a.m. Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. The phone number is (541) 469-CLAM (2526).

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