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Chinese restaurant opens in Brookings Print E-mail
Written by Marge Woodfin, Pilot staff writer   
December 11, 2010 04:00 am

Ming Chen, owner and chef of the Dragon Palace restaurant at 1025 Chetco Avenue in Brookings, comes from a family of restaurateurs.

Since his move to the United States 10 years ago from Canton, China, he has worked in a number of family-owned restaurants in Medford, Florence, Eugene and Coos Bay.

Having acquired that wide variety of experience, Ming decided it was time to start his own restaurant. With help from his friend, associate and distant relative, Eric Chen, Ming Chen opened the doors of the Dragon Palace on Nov. 24 and began offering his own special Chinese menu.

He told the Pilot he learned to cook in China where the many varieties of cuisine and cooking techniques influenced him in developing his own culinary style.

He said he makes everything fresh, with less oil and less salt.

“And no MSG,” added Eric Chen, who serves as the restaurant’s manager.

“We have low prices and serve huge portions,” he said.

Brookings residents Bill and Patty Adams enjoyed a recent meal there.

“This is the best place in town,” Bill said.

The Dragon Palace is open every day from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., with lunch served from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and dinner from 3 p.m. to closing.

The two large rooms adjacent to the main dining area are available for private parties and special occasions.

Ming said that he and his family, including his wife, three sons, and a daughter, like living in Brookings and look forward to making new friends as he and Eric work to provide healthy, delicious meals to their customers.

 

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