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News arrow News arrow Business arrow CURRY GENERAL BEGINS CEO RECRUITMENT

CURRY GENERAL BEGINS CEO RECRUITMENT Print E-mail
October 02, 2007 11:00 pm

GOLD BEACH –Curry General Hospital board members next week are scheduled to interview final candidates for a new chief executive officer expected to lead the Curry Health Network out of its current financial difficulties and into a new era of improved health care accessibility.

Discussing the recruitment process that has been under way for more than six weeks, interim CEO Tom Troy told board members in regular session, Wednesday, Sept. 26, that he would present the board with six top choices from the field of about 30 applicants.

"Your job won't be easy," he told them. "These are all highly qualified individuals. I was impressed with their qualifications."

The board then plans to narrow the choices to four candidates who each will be invited to spend several hours talking with Troy and the board members, and touring the hospital and its clinics, Monday, Oct. 15 and Wednesday, Oct. 17. Troy said department managers also would be encouraged to meet with each of them.

Troy was hired in June to take over the top post as temporary hospital administrator when the board dissolved its longtime management council. Since then, two other interim staff have been hired to help in the fiscal department.

In earlier discussion, board member Dugie Freeman expressed reservation that a brand new CEO might not be inclined to follow the new path that Troy has established emphasizing leadership and staff education. Troy and Ron Hulscher, interim chief financial office, both said they would be willing to return to Gold Beach periodically as consultants to confer with the new administrator.

In other board business, Troy gave a positive assessment of the recent board retreat, held Wednesday, Sept. 19, in the Sand N Sea motel, Gold Beach.

"To me, the question is figuring out how you want to finance what you want to ultimately do. That's why we?re focusing on internalization and the bottom line now."

For example, Troy cited the curry General Hospital nursing department.

"We've got a lot of investment ahead of us in the nursing department," he said.

"I know it takes all of us to run the hospital, but they're the ones giving the care to patients. Eventually, we?ll need to talk about accreditation and standards,? he said, reiterating the plan for new nursing leadership and education in the department.

Ginny Hochberg, clinical administrator for the past 10 years, will leave her post Wednesday, Oct. 10. She and her husband, Dr. Charles Hochberg, obstetrician-gynecologist, plan to relocated to a teaching hospital in West Virginia.

Also during the Sept. 26 board meeting, Brookings resident Lyn Griggs of Brookings, proposed a fundraising idea to the board in memory of her late husband, Bill Griggs.

Mr. Griggs died of liver cancer earlier this year, but during his illness, he also suffered a broken leg.

His widow asked if it would be appropriate to raise funds for a new X-ray machine at the Brookings Medical Center as a memorial.

Board member Roger Davis told Griggs that he would present the idea to the Curry Health Foundation at the group's next meeting, Monday, Oct. 1.

Meanwhile, Davis announced to his co-members that after serving on the district board for the past 12 years, he plans to retire following the next regular meeting.

The public is invited to attend the next board session scheduled for 2:30 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 24 in the Curry General Hospital conference room.

 

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