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COUPLE SEEKS FRESH START IN BROOKINGS WITH NEW CLEANING BUSINESS

Scott and Lori Jewkes focus on residential and business cleaning. (The Pilot/Ellen Babin).
Scott and Lori Jewkes focus on residential and business cleaning. (The Pilot/Ellen Babin).

By Ellen Babin

Pilot staff writer

The constantly rising cost of living in Santa Cruz, Calif., spurred Scott and Lori Jewkes to move their business to a town where they could have a "fighting chance" of owning a place of their own.

They recently transplanted their business, Lemon Fresh Cleaning, to Brookings. They have already purchased a home.

Insured and bonded, the couple concentrates mainly on residential and some business clients.

In business together for 15 years, the two have a system when it comes to cleaning. Scott is in charge of the floors, often foregoing a mop and getting down on his hands and knees. Lori does the bathrooms and kitchens. They are able to clean at least two houses a day.

They each charge $30 an hour. The couple brings all necessary cleaning supplies but will use whatever cleaners the client requests.

While they plan on working hard, they would also like time to play, something that was missing in Santa Cruz.

Lori has started baking dog biscuits for the South Coast Humane Society, and Scott likes to fish and bicycle.

Lemon Fresh Cleaning can be reached at (541) 469-6467.

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