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C&K Markets adds two stores to existing chain

Brookings-based C&K Markets announced this week that it is adding two more stores to its chain of markets in Oregon.

C&K, which owns ShopSmart and Ray’s Food Place markets, will be taking over Select Market in Drain and the Philomath Thriftway in Philomath

Drain is a rural town with deep roots in the logging industry and is at the crossroads of Oregon Route 99 and 38, at a pass in the Coast Range on the way to the Pacific Ocean, according to a C&K press release.

 

Plans to update the interior decor and racking are  under way with a grand opening date tentatively set for Thursday, Aug. 16.

 “We are pleased to acquire the Select Market in Drain and the opportunity it affords us to serve the Drain  community and surrounding areas,” said C&K Market, Inc. Executive Vice President Alan Nidiffer.  

Highlights of the grand opening festivities will include giveaways, enter-to-wins, a free community barbecue and special product offers.

C&K recently purchased the Philomath Thriftway, located  five miles south of Corvallis (home of Oregon State University), and is significantly renovating the existing  building, which will be renamed Ray’s Food Place.

Plans for the Aug. 8 grand opening are under way with giveaways, a free community barbecue and special product offers highlighting the festivities.

“The community of Philomath is a natural fit with our companies’ core competencies of quality, service and local offerings,” said Nidiffer said.

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