>Brookings Oregon News, Sports, & Weather | The Curry Coastal Pilot

News Classifieds Web
web powered by Web Search Powered by Google

News arrow News arrow Business arrow CENSUS BOOSTS STATE EMPLOYMENT

CENSUS BOOSTS STATE EMPLOYMENT Print E-mail
June 10, 2000 11:00 pm

SALEM Boosted by the hiring of 4,200 temporary workers to assist with Census 2000, Oregons total nonfarm payroll employment grew by 12,400 in May, according to the Oregon Employment Department.

In April, 700 intermittent census workers were employed by the state. By May, the total had risen to 5,900. May should be the peak month of workers involved in this once-a-decade enumeration, department officials said.

We have five offices throughout the state that have hired more than 1,000 people each to go door-to-door to follow up on the surveys, said Pam Harlan, Oregon area director of the U.S. Census Bureau. We anticipate finishing that huge task in about two weeks. There will be other activities continuing through August, but with a reduced staff.

Total payroll employment in May grew by 3,600 more than would have been expected primarily because of seasonal factors, officials said. Excluding the census workers, total employment would have been more in line with the normal seasonal pattern.

Oregons seasonally adjusted unemployment rate rose to 5.0 percent in May from 4.6 percent in April. At the same time, the U.S. unemployment rate rose to 4.1 percent in May from 3.9 percent in April, officials said.

Although Oregons unemployment jumped up a bit in May, the rate is still below last Mays rate of 5.8 percent, said David Cooke, an economist with the Employment Department. Last year at this time, many sectors of Oregons economy were still recovering from the effects of the Asian financial crisis that started in 1997.

This year, the strong U.S. and California economies have helped lower Oregons unemployment rate to levels seldom seen in the last 30 years.

Outside of the federal government sector, where the census workers are employed, most sectors of Oregons economy were stable in May, officials said.

Of the eight major industry sectors, five showed changes of less than 1,000 jobs compared to their normal trend for the time of year. Services posted no change in overall employment for the month and has seen no employment gains above it normal trend during 2000, officials said.

Similarly, transportation and public utilities showed no net employment change in May and has expanded by 700 jobs above its seasonal trend in the first five months of the year, officials said. Finance, insurance and real estate was essentially flat in May and is 700 jobs below its normal hiring pattern for the year.

A fourth major sector to show a typical hiring pattern for May was construction, which boosted its workforce by 1,300 jobs, officials said.

The two major industries with unusual changes in their May employment levels were manufacturing and retail trade, officials said.

Manufacturing posted a job gain of 300, when a gain of 2,200 would have been a typical May increase for the industry, officials said.

Food and kindred products manufacturers cut back by 300 jobs in May. This came in a month when 800 net new jobs would normally be added in the sector. Fish processing factories have been hit hard by declines in availability of certain species, officials said. Several other canneries and food processing firms are off to a slow start to their upcoming summer season.

Lumber and wood products manufacturing posted a gain of 400 jobs in May, when a gain of 700 would have been the norm for the month, officials said. The weak job gains were because of closures and cutbacks at some mills.

Wood products prices are well below year-ago levels and appear to be putting pressure on mills. Recent employment patterns in lumber and wood products manufacturing have continued the industrys trend of moderate job reductions during the past few years, officials said.

One bright spot in manufacturing was electronic equipment manufacturing, the industry group made up largely of computer chip manufacturers. Several chip manufacturers are hiring in earnest again, officials said. This industry added 200 jobs in May, and has added 1,500 jobs to its payrolls since May 1999.

Retail trade posted its second strong month, after a sharp drop in March, officials said. All published sectors of retail trade added jobs in May.

Furniture and home furnishings stores were noteworthy in that they added 700 jobs. The opening of three new home electronics stores in the Portland area was partially responsible for the strong job gains in this sector, officials said.

 

Business News by Yahoo Finance

  • Argentine default looms as time runs out for debt deal
    Argentina looks set to default on its debt for the second time in 12 years next Thursday as negotiations with "holdout" investors seemingly go nowhere and neither side shows signs of blinking first, though a last minute deal can't be discounted. After a slew of legal setbacks for Argentina in U.S. courts, the country has just days to comply with a 2012 ruling by U.S. District Judge Thomas Griesa to pay $1.33 billion plus interest to the funds it calls "vultures." If the deadlock persists, Griesa will prevent Argentina from making a July 30 deadline for a coupon payment on exchanged bonds, triggering a new default just as the economy struggles with recession, dwindling reserves and soaring inflation. Unlike Argentina's 2001-2 debt crisis when it was broke and could not pay its civil servants, this time around the country is solvent but prevented by Griesa from servicing its bonds until the battle with the holdouts is resolved.
  • Apple iPhones allow extraction of deep personal data, researcher finds
    Personal data including text messages, contact lists and photos can be extracted from iPhones through previously unpublicized techniques by Apple Inc employees, the company acknowledged this week. The same techniques to circumvent backup encryption could be used by law enforcement or others with access to the "trusted" computers to which the devices have been connected, according to the security expert who prompted Apple's admission. In a conference presentation this week, researcher Jonathan Zdziarski showed how the services take a surprising amount of data for what Apple now says are diagnostic services meant to help engineers. As word spread about Zdziarski’s initial presentation at the Hackers on Planet Earth conference, some cited it as evidence of Apple collaboration with the National Security Agency.
  • Wall St. Week Ahead: Even modest GDP bounce may support market
    Even if data next week shows a mediocre rebound in U.S. economic growth, that might be enough to keep the stock market aloft at record highs and the Federal Reserve steadfast in its winding down of stimulus through bond purchases. Growth had shrunk 2.9 percent in the first quarter due to a harsh winter and spending cuts tied to the federal Affordable Care Act. Indeed, Friday's disappointing report on durable goods orders in June spurred JPMorgan and Goldman Sachs to shave their second-quarter outlook by 0.1 percentage point to 2.6 percent and 3.0 percent growth, respectively.

Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Twitter

© Copyright 2001 - 2014 Western Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. By Using this site you agree to our Terms of Use