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Businesses, offices closed for Thanksgiving

Businesses and government offices will be closed Thursday, Nov. 28 in observance of Thanksgiving Day.

City and county offices will be closed on Thanksgiving Day but police, sheriff, fire and other emergency services will remain in operation. City offices will be closed Thursday, Nov. 28, as well as county offices.

Closed on  Thursday: 

•Schools in the Brookings-Harbor School District, and Southwestern Oregon Community College;

•U.S. Post Office; 

•Oregon Department of Motor Vehicles;

•All local banks;

•Chetco Community Public Library will close early at 5 p.m. Wednesday Nov. 27 and will remain closed Thanksgiving Day as well as Friday, Nov. 29. 

Curry Transfer and Recycling will observe regular trash pickups for residences and businesses. The office will be closed, as well as the transfer stations. 

Chetco Activity Center will offer a Thanksgiving dinner with all the trimmings. First seating is at 11:30 a.m., second seating is at 1 p.m. Advance cost is $10 for adults, and children 5 to 10 years $5; cost at the door will be adults $13, children $5. 

Fred Meyer will be open from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.; pharmacy will be closed.

Ray’s Market will be open from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Shop Smart will be open from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Grocery Outlet will be open 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Rite Aid will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The pharmacy will be open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Most fast food restaurants, retail stores, and some independently-owned businesses will be open. Call ahead to be sure. 

Offices of the Curry Coastal Pilot will be closed.

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