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Business owner keeps busy creating glass art

Ruth Stoner, proprietor of Glassic Designs, 1105 D Chetco Ave., has a small bathtub size kiln that she keeps busy slumping, shaping, and draping glass of all sizes, colors and shapes.

Ruth and her husband John moved to Brookings in November last year. She said she came to Brookings from the mountains of Colorado when John, a mental health coordinator, said he had been thinking about making a move and he wanted to live in a small town by the ocean.

After a bit of investigating, they decided to take a look at the Oregon Coast. “We came to look in May, and we liked it,” she said. “He was offered a job and we moved in November.”

Her education in sociology with an emphasis on psychology led to a career in the practice of stress management, a far cry from her current complete involvement in creating beauty with glass.

“I dabbled in art all my life, and I always wanted to take a class in stained glass, but my practice in stress management left me little time for art,” she said.

She explained that the call of creativity finally won out and she began to take classes in introduction to fusing glass, and participating in glass and bead shows in Nevada. “I just decided to do it,” she said. “And in my mountain home in Colorado I had a studio where I taught classes and sold pieces.”

About the glass she works with, she said, “I love the light areas, and I’m inspired by animals, nature, spider webs, trees and flowers.”

She creates bowls, plates, splashers, glass sinks, and jewelry of many kinds and shapes, all from beautiful glass that she has learned how to fashion into one-of-a-kind, fascinating collectors’ pieces.

Ruth said she and John are both happy to be in Brookings. “We love it here. We have met such wonderful people,” she said. She specifically mentioned Jack and Merri Cook, whose Wild Bird and Backyard General Store is in the same complex where Glassic Designs is located. “They have been so wonderful to me and helped me so much,” she said.

She welcomes visitors to her studio Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and she will be teaching a class from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 17, and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday, April 18.

The class is limited; however, there is a possible opening. Anyone interested may contact Ruth at 714-429-3463, or pop by Glassic Design studio to get acquainted and enjoy the beauty she has created with glass. She will show you how she does it and why she loves the process.

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