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News arrow News arrow Business arrow Brookings woman’s FlowerPik invention hits prime time

Brookings woman’s FlowerPik invention hits prime time Print E-mail
Written by Jef Hatch, Pilot staff writer   
June 12, 2010 05:00 am

Brookings entrepreneur Danielle Doyle wears one of her FlowerPik invention in her hair. The Pilot/Arwyn Rice
Upon first glance Danielle Doyle does not strike one as an inventor. Nowhere are the thick glasses, the pocket protector, the pencil tied up in her hair. In fact, she has nothing in her hair but her latest invention, the FlowerPik.

Doyle has created a much needed item in the world of fashion, a personal, wearable bloom saving device.

Doyle was on a belated –11 years after the fact – honeymoon in Hawaii with her husband O’Donell and realized that she had a need to keep the flowers fresh that she was putting in her hair.

Before leaving Hawaii, the Doyles had formulated their idea for what type of product was needed and the FlowerPik was born.

Their honeymoon over, the Doyles began researching. Looking for something that would stay in all types of hair and keep flowers fresh at the same time was a time-wasting process.

“There was nothing like it on the market,” Doyle said. “So we began working with a local plastics manufacturer to get the concept just right.”

A small plastic vial with a cap and a clip that holds enough water to keep a flower alive most of the day, the FlowerPik has become a “just right” concept that bloomed into the perfect product.

Doyle, a stay at home mom, home-schools her two children Erika, 12, and Ocean, 10 and decided to turn the process of invention into an object lesson.

“From A-to-Z, the children have been involved in the process the entire way,” Doyle explained. “We really want them to learn more than just what is found in school books.”

The Doyle children have been taught in a very hands-on method; raising 4-H animals to learn animal husbandry, planting and maintaining their own garden so they could eat wholesome foods, living in a motor home while they helped their father renovate their home.

That hands-on method has certainly extended to the FlowerPik project.

“Snap and cap,” Ocean said when asked about his part in the process. “All of the caps and the vials came in separate boxes and we had to assemble them ourselves. We had to ‘snap’ closed the clips and put on the caps.”

Erika models the product for the packaging and website images as well as helping out with the assembly line process.

“It has been really fun doing all the packaging,” Erika beamed. “We put on a movie in the ‘flowerpik’ room and just sit there as a family putting it all together.”

From manufacturing to distribution to a media campaign, Doyle has tried to keep everything “made in the USA.”

“I want to help stimulate the United States economy and one way I can do that is to keep all my manufacturing in the U.S.” Doyle explained.

The FlowerPik has been featured on KTVL Channel 10 Evening News in Medford and is set to be featured on The Today Show.

The product will be introduced to the nation on a segment called “Jill’s Fashion Emergencies” and will air at 10 a.m. Wednesday, June 16, on NBC.

The FlowerPik is available online at www.flowerpik.com as well as at local stores including Chetco Pharmacy and Gifts, The Fashion Wave, Winchuck Gardens, Flora Pacifica, Salon Dolce and Main Street Fashions.

 

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