>Brookings Oregon News, Sports, & Weather | The Curry Coastal Pilot

News Classifieds Web
web powered by Web Search Powered by Google

News arrow News arrow Business arrow Brookings newest pet store, Carson's Critters, a family affair

Brookings newest pet store, Carson's Critters, a family affair Print E-mail
December 31, 2011 04:13 am

Pet store owner Tracy Carson and her son Hunter, with a few of the critters for sale at their new shop in Brookings. The Pilot/Lorna Rodriguez
 

Carson’s Critters, a new pet store in Brookings, is run by a family who love animals and strives to create a family-friendly atmosphere in their store.

Tracy Carson, her husband Jeremy, son Hunter, daughter Cheyanne and brother Jeremy Johnson all pitch in. 

Hunter, 12, helps fill water bottles, feeds animals, cleans takes and cages, assists customers and plays with the animals.

 

 “I think it’s fun to help, and I like having animals,” he said. “My favorite part is seeing the animals, and holding them. I try my best to help the animals get used to humans.”

Cheyanne works after school, and Jeremy feeds the snakes.

Carson’s Critters, which opened Sept. 1, is located at 613 Chetco Ave. It is officially open from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. (although the owners try to open by 10 a.m.) Monday through Saturday. 

“It’s a pet store with a wide variety of exotics, and supplies and food,” Tracy said. “My goal is to have the most unique pet store around. The biggest, the best, the most unique.”

The store is filled with birds, chinchillas, fish, ferrets, frogs, gerbils, guinea pigs, hamsters, lizards,  mice, rabbits, rats, snakes, spiders and turtles.

However, if the store doesn’t carry what a customer needs, Tracy doesn’t mind ordering the item.

“If I can order it, I’ll do it for ya,” she said.

The store is full of five rooms of animals and supplies.

The front room of the store is full of birds, pet food and supplies. Off of the main area is a section full of fish. Down the hall there are three rooms. One is the “furry” room, filled with rabbits, guinea pigs, rats and the like. Another is the snake and lizard area, and the third is the breeding room. 

Tracy breeds chinchillas, guinea pigs, mice, rabbits and rats. 

Tracy decided to open because “Brookings needs a pet store.”

The only other pet store in town is Brookings Pets.

She said a several existing pet stores in town were for sale, so she bought one, relocated and decided to open. 

“The opportunity came up, and who doesn’t want to have a pet store?” she said.

Tracy chose the name Carson’s Critters because she’s a Carson, and there are critters in the store.

“I wanted to make it unique and original,” she said. 

When Tracy first opened, business was slow, but it’s picked up.

“I’ve seen a steady increase since we moved,” she said.

In the new year, Tracy plans to make a few additions to her store.

She will work on earning her USDA license to carry sugar gliders and hedge hogs, and will add a bird room to the store. She will also start carrying cat and dog supplies.

“I love it all. I love everything about it,” Tracy said.

 

 

Business News by Yahoo Finance

  • Wall Street Week Ahead: Spring fever brings hope for U.S. earnings
    Several behemoths, including Apple, the largest U.S. company by market value, as well as Microsoft, McDonald's (MCD.N) and AT&T (NYS:T), are due to report earnings. They'll be accompanied by highfliers like Netflix and Facebook, giving the first real cross-section of the state of corporate America as temperatures rise across the country and investors hope to put the cold weather behind them. Strategists will also be looking for clues on how badly China's slowdown hits U.S. corporate results. The first batch of earnings came out as equities were working their way through a selloff led by trading-crowd favorites like Netflix and the biotech stocks.
  • Rajaratnam's brother loses bid to dismiss insider trading charges
    Rengan Rajaratnam, the younger brother of imprisoned hedge fund manager Raj Rajaratnam, on Friday lost a bid to dismiss some of the insider trading charges leveled against him last year. U.S. District Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald in Manhattan ruled that the indictment adequately alleged the essential elements of the crimes charged. A lawyer for Rajaratnam did not respond to a request for comment. A spokeswoman for Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara declined to comment.
  • Compensation battle rages four years after BP's U.S. oil spill
    Jules Melancon, the last remaining oyster fisherman on an island dotted with colorful houses on stilts, says he has not found a single oyster alive in his leases in the area since the leak and relies on an onshore oyster nursery to make a living. The British oil major has paid out billions of dollars in compensation under a settlement experts say is unprecedented in its breadth. Some claimants are satisfied, but others are irate that BP is now challenging aspects of the settlement. The oil company has spent over $26 billion on cleaning up, fines and compensation for the disaster, which killed 11 people on the rig and spilled millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico for 87 days after the blast on April 20, 2010.

Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Twitter

© Copyright 2001 - 2014 Western Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. By Using this site you agree to our Terms of Use