>Brookings Oregon News, Sports, & Weather | The Curry Coastal Pilot

News Classifieds Web
web powered by Web Search Powered by Google

News arrow News arrow Business arrow Brookings nail technician makes house calls

Brookings nail technician makes house calls Print E-mail
Written by Lorna Rodriguez, Pilot staff writer   
January 25, 2013 09:25 pm
Michelle Connolly gives a pedicure in a home. The Pilot/Lorna Rodriguez
Michelle Connolly gives a pedicure in a home. The Pilot/Lorna Rodriguez
Door to Door Nails is just as it sounds — a door-to-door nail service in which owner Michelle Connolly travels to people’s homes with all of her gear to serve their nail needs.

Connolly offers manicures, pedicures, gel nails, basic reflexology and massage. She started the business in Brookings in October after being a nail tech in Washington state for more than 20 years. 

“I did it this way in Washington, and it was such a success,” Connolly said. “It just seems as though so many people want to have the same things as someone who is mobile.”

At first, Connolly was inspired by new moms who found it difficult to get out of the house, but has since realized there are so many people who are home bound and can’t get out, so she decided to serve them, too. 

It’s for “anybody who can’t get out. Anybody who is wanting to have a spa experience in their house,” she said.

Connolly’s hours are Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., but she is willing to make exceptions. 

When asked how business is going, Connolly responded “Pretty good. All new things take time to get worked out.”

Door to Door Nails also isn’t gender specific; it is open to men as well. 

“It’s about removing stigmas,” Connolly said. “Salons represent a place for women to go. We’re erasing stigmas and getting rid of boundaries. It’s about health and erasing stigmas about things people are embarrassed to go get help with in public.”

So far, people mostly hear about her services through word of mouth; she receives phone calls from hospice care patients and senior homes. But people can also visit her website, www.doortodoornails.com, or call her at 541-251-1915  to schedule an appointment.  

Before Connolly visits a client, she calls them up and asks them about their specific concerns or needs. She also uses the consultation to make sure she is not walking into an unsafe situation. Once she has finished a consultation, she schedules an appointment. 

The appointment lasts about an hour, and the price depends on the client and their needs. 

“It’s really about accommodating the person,” Connolly said. “I’m not going to charge someone low income $40 or $50. It’s just about being specific to that person’s needs. Everyone is treated individually; they’re not lumped into one category.”

Betty Daugherty and Jeff Earl are two clients who Connolly sees on a regular basis.

“I like to have her come,” Daugherty said. “She’s a lovely person. … I did it because I can’t bend over and I can’t see my toenails let alone reach them, so it’s a wonderful answer for me.

“The fact is I’m almost 84-years-old, and it’s a little difficult to drive, and this way she comes to my house instead of me looking for her, and that’s always a plus. She’s very qualified, and has gone to school and knows what she’s doing.”

Jeff Earl has enjoyed his visits with Connolly, too.

“I think she does a fantastic job,” he said. “I’ve been injured for the last couple of years where I can’t bend over and do my own toenails and stuff like that. … Being a man, I’ve always stayed back from having a pedicure, but she does a fantastic job. She’s a very cheerful, polite woman that I think is going to do fantastic in the business she’s in. For any man that’s afraid to have a pedicure: step up and do it because you will enjoy it.”

Earl said he likes how bubbly, polite and kind Connolly is. 

“She’s a very delightful person to be around,” he said. “She’s a very easy person to get along with.”

Earl also likes that Connolly is willing to travel to people’s homes. 

“That’s one thing I didn’t want to do was go into a beauty shop,” he said. “It made it that much easier because I’m pretty much bound to a wheelchair right now. It was more personal than going to a nail shop and getting them done there. It just wasn’t as stressful. I would recommend (Connolly) to anybody.”

In addition to her nail technician’s licenses and certificates, Connolly also has a Bachelor of Science in Sociology from Portland State University and a Rural Services certification. 

“Living in a rural community, I wanted to do something that fit the rural area,” Connolly said. “I wanted to do something coupled with my degrees. I want to help people, and if I have a skill or a gift, I can share with people, I will give them what they need.”

While in school, Connolly thought she was done with nails, but said God kept leading her back to nails. 

Connolly said she enjoys the one-on-one time with a client and being able to focus on what they need, and the design and art elements.

Currently, Connolly serves the Brookings-Harbor community. She will consider traveling outside of the area, but the costs will be higher due to mileage. 

In the future, Connolly would like to expand; she would like to be able to travel to Gold Beach or Smith River. She is duly licensed in Oregon and Washington, but not in California yet; she also hopes to offer group rates and acrylic nails. 

“I just hope I’m doing what someone would do for me,” Connolly said. “I just want to help people.”

 

Business News by Yahoo Finance

  • Facebook says SEC's IPO probe ends, extending WhatsApp closing date
    In its quarterly report filed on Thursday, Facebook said the regulator in May "notified us that it had terminated its inquiry and that no enforcement action had been recommended by the SEC." Facebook shares began trading on May 18, 2012, but soon fell below their $38 per share offering price and had lost more than half their value by the middle of August, angering investors. Investors also complained they were not told just prior to the IPO that analysts at Facebook's investment banks were cutting their forecasts after learning of the company's internal projections for advertising revenue. The end of the SEC probe does not affect shareholder litigation against Facebook, Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg and many banks over the Menlo Park, California-based company's IPO.
  • U.S. business spending data gives mixed signals on growth
    A mixed reading on the health of U.S. business investment on Friday suggested the economy may not have rebounded as strongly in the second quarter as previously believed, but it offered hope for the rest of 2014. Non-defense capital goods orders excluding aircraft, a closely watched proxy for business spending plans, rebounded 1.4 percent after declining by a downwardly revised 1.2 percent the prior month, the Commerce Department said. Core capital goods shipments are used to calculate equipment spending in the government's gross domestic product measurement. "The weak performance in core capital goods shipments during the quarter suggests that this segment of the economy is unlikely to contribute much to economic activity," said Millan Mulraine, deputy chief economist at TD Securities in New York.
  • Wall St. closes lower on Amazon, Visa; S&P's weekly gain erased
    U.S. stocks closed lower on Friday in a broad consumer discretionary-led selloff after Visa and Amazon, a pair of closely watched bellwether names, reported disappointing results. While the S&P 500 found support at its 14-day moving average, suggesting a recent positive trend in equities remains intact, the day's decline was enough to erase the benchmark index's gain for the week. Amazon.com Inc tumbled 9.6 percent to $324.01 as the biggest drag on the S&P 500 after reporting an unexpectedly big second-quarter loss due to greater expenses on investments. Visa Inc was the Dow's largest decliner, down 3.6 percent to $214.77 after the world's largest credit and debit card company cut its revenue forecast for the year.

Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Twitter

© Copyright 2001 - 2014 Western Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. By Using this site you agree to our Terms of Use