>Brookings Oregon News, Sports, & Weather | The Curry Coastal Pilot

News Classifieds Web
web powered by Web Search Powered by Google

News arrow News arrow Business arrow BROOKINGS BUSINESS OFFERS PATIENTS 'OPEN' MRI MACHINE

Print

BROOKINGS BUSINESS OFFERS PATIENTS 'OPEN' MRI MACHINE

By Ellen Babin

Pilot staff writer

A new business in Brookings will provide added comfort to patients needing Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

The business, Brookings Open MRI, is in the process of installing an "open" MRI scanner at its new location, 555 Fifth St.

On Thursday, December 27, the 34,000-pound Hitachi MRI was lifted from the a semi-truck by a crane, then set into place inside the new business.

Brookings Open MRI is the second facility of its kind owned by Medford Open MRI in Medford.

According to Shelle Franceschini, administrator of the two sites, an open MRI does not enclose the patient within a confining tunnel as in other types of MRI equipment.

Instead, an open MRI has open sides, giving all patients – including those who are claustrophobic or larger-sized – added comfort.

She noted that in the past, people had to travel to Medford Open MRI.

Franceschini said that the Brookings facility will include an on-site MRI rechnologist. A special computer system will be used to relay information within a few seconds to a radiologist in Medford.

Brookings Open MRI is scheduled to be open sometime in February. Its hours will be Mondays through Fridays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Company representatives will personally visit all medical offices in Crescent and Brookings before opening, to make practitioners aware of the new MRI.

"We are going to be bending over backwards so referred patients are able to get their scan as soon as possible," Franceschini said.

For more information, phone Medford Open MRI, (541) 857-8563.

Print

Business News by Yahoo Finance

  • Asian shares fall for third day on global growth concerns
    Asian shares fell for a third straight day on Wednesday as weak manufacturing reports from China, the United States and Europe fueled worries about slowing global growth, while the safe-haven Japanese yen firmed as investors unwound carry trades. MSCI's broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan was down 1.2 percent by late morning, taking its losses to nearly 4 percent so far this week as investors continued to dump emerging market assets. While signs of an emerging market slowdown has been evident for a while in the form of falling commodity prices and weak trade growth, investors had been broadly sanguine on the hopes that robust demand from the U.S. and China would keep the global growth engines chugging along.
  • Factory slowdown puts wrinkle in U.S. growth outlook
    U.S. factory activity braked to a more than two-year low in August, but sturdy gains in automobile sales and construction spending suggested the economy remained on solid footing. The sharp slowdown in manufacturing, which has been hurt by a strong dollar and deep spending cuts in the energy sector, was probably an early indication of fallout from the recent turmoil in stock markets, economists said. "It suggests that the recent eruption in uncertainty toward Chinese and global growth is beginning to affect U.S. business decisions," said Millan Mulraine, deputy chief economist at TD Securities in New York.
  • Oil prices extend losses on U.S. oil inventory, manufacturing data
    Oil prices fell around 2 percent in early Asian trade on Wednesday, as a stronger than expected build in U.S. crude oil stocks and weaker U.S. manufacturing data fueled a rout in prices that started in the previous session. Brent and U.S. crude finished around 8 percent lower on Tuesday to end a 25-percent three-session surge, the largest three-day gain since 1990. This rollercoaster volatility could continue especially if there are similar wild swings in the equity markets, said Ric Spooner, chief market analyst at Sydney's CMC Markets.

Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Follow Curry Coastal Pilot headlines on Twitter

© Copyright 2001 - 2015 Western Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. By Using this site you agree to our Terms of Use