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BROOKINGS ART GALLERY EXPANDS

By Marjorie Woodfin

Pilot staff writer

Eye For Art Gallery owners, Dusanka Kralj and Barbara Kennedy, introduced an additional new studio when they hosted the Brookings Harbor Chamber of Commerce mixer Friday, June 8.

The Eye For Art Gallery was opened last November to provide a showplace for quality contemporary and abstract art. "It's going very well and we haven't even gotten into the tourist season yet," Kralj said in a recent interview.

So well, in fact, that they have expanded into the additional studio on the hallway just behind the gallery to provide space for gallery artist Destiny Schwartz who creates art that incorporates flora and fauna in unusual ways. "Her work is unique and fascinating. We're really lucky to have her," Kralj said.

Kralj and Kennedy, who are both well known and accomplished artists, are active in national and international art circles. In addition to exhibiting their own work, they are currently presenting an exciting new abstract display for the months of June and July.

The display is the work of six talented artists from PDX!WAM (Portland Women in Abstract Media), titled "Seeing Red." It is billed as an abstract show exploring the many moods of red, which is the color that symbolizes many emotions.

Kralj and Kennedy, who met at an advanced abstract painting workshop at the Mendocino Art Center and discovered they lived only 20 minutes apart, both have careers outside of art.

Kralj is a licensed psychologist who has provided mental health services since 1975, with offices in Brookings and Crescent City. Successfully juried into the National Association of Women Artists in New York, her work is exhibited in several national juried exhibitions.

Kennedy and her husband Michael own Tangles Salon and Spa in Brookings. An expert in oils, watercolor and acrylics, her versatile creations include realism, plein-air, seascapes and mixed media.

Both artists, whose work is not limited by size or scope, accept commissions and have created large pieces for banks and other businesses.

Kralj said she and Kennedy see the art scene in Brookings continuing to grow and they are happy to be a part of it, including the Second Saturday Art Walks.

She said their goal in the beginning was to open their gallery in a location near the other galleries on Chetco Avenue and they are delighted to be just where they are.

Eye For Art, located at 519 Chetco Ave., is open Wednesday through Saturday, noon to 6 p.m.

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