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BLACK FOREST CLOCK SHOP REOPENS IN HARBOR

Co-owner Kevin Webb stands next to one of many clocks in the recently reopened Black Forest Clock Shop in Harbor. (The Pilot/Leah Weissman).
Co-owner Kevin Webb stands next to one of many clocks in the recently reopened Black Forest Clock Shop in Harbor. (The Pilot/Leah Weissman).

By Leah Weissman

Pilot staff writer

Every hour on the hour, the sound of dozens of cuckoo clocks, grandfather clocks, anniversary clocks and a variety of wall clocks chime in unison at the Black Forest Clock Shop in Harbor.

After closing the store and moving to Medford three years ago, co-owners Kevin and Karen Webb reopened the clock and watch repair business March 4, and are happy to be Brookings-Harbor residents again.

"We missed it so much here, we decided to come back," Karen said. "We missed the weather, the small town and the people."

According to Kevin, some things in the shop have changed, while other services have stayed the same.

"We still repair all types of watches from pocket watches to Rolexes, and all types of clocks from cuckoo clocks to grandfather clocks," Kevin said. "And we still offer house calls, too."

Customers can also come in to install and buy batteries and purchase watchbands.

"With minor repairs, we can fix thing while people wait," Kevin said.

A new addition to the store is a machine shop area in the back – where Kevin said he plans to design and build custom-ordered clocks from scratch.

"For instance, I'm going to build a 7-foot-tall anniversary clock for a lady here soon," he said.

An anniversary clock is a symbol of a husband and wife's life and love together, and is wound once a year by the couple on the day of their wedding anniversary.

After reopening their store just a few weeks ago, new and old customers have already started filling the shop.

"When we came back, a lot of people were so happy – and so were we," Kevin said.

Even while living in Medford, Kevin said he still visited Brookings on a monthly basis to do house calls for his loyal customers.

"I never completely left – I always had my foot in the door," he said.

Black Forest Clock Shop is located at 15138 McVay Lane off Highway 101. Hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, call (541) 412-8804.

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