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Auto repair shop marks five years in business Print E-mail
Written by Evelyn Cook, Pilot staff writer   
March 09, 2011 04:00 am

Laurie and Ken Podesta-Daniels have been in the auto repair business in Brookings for five years. The Pilot/Evelyn Cook
The owners of Doctor “D” Autocare are celebrating five years of doing business in Brookings by offering a new discount program called “D” dollars to show customers their appreciation.

“It’s our way of giving back to the community. This town has been amazing to us,” said Laurie Podesta-Daniels who owns and operates Doctor “D” Autocare along with her husband, Ken Podesta-Daniels.

“Ken has always wanted to have his picture on money, so we’re giving out Doctor ‘D’ dollars with his picture on them,” she said.

When customers spend more than $50, they’ll receive Doctor “D” dollars worth 10 percent of what they spent. Those “D” dollars can then be used to help pay for future automotive work done at Doctor “D,” Podesta-Daniels said.

Doctor “D” Autocare opened in Brookings in February 2006, and is located at 614 Memory Lane, near the Brookings post office. The phone number is 541-469-3204.

Ken and Laurie Podesta-Daniels are originally from Sacramento, where Ken had his first shop. The couple met when she brought him a car that needed fixing. They married in 1973. Since then, they’ve produced six children who’ve added seven grandchildren to the family, she said.

The couple ran a large auto shop in Elk Grove, Calif., for 16 years before relocating to Brookings.

“We’re a mom and pop shop, run by just Ken and me and our adopted daughter, Kristen Purdy. Ken works on the cars, I do the marketing and public relations, and Kristen runs the office,” she said.

“The ‘D’ Dollars are new, but we still have our oil change coupons that give customers discounts,” she said.

The main goal of Doctor “D,” she said, is to stand out as an honest, reputable, full-service auto shop that can fix any type of vehicle no matter what make, model, or year – foreign or domestic.

“Ken has been fixing cars for 40 years. He can do everything from installing a new windshield to rebuilding your engine, and everything in between,” she said.

“He does extended warranties and insurance work, and specializes in high-performance vehicles, diesel engines and Cadillacs. He’s ASE certified, a master mechanic and a master technician.

“If Ken can’t fix your car right,  he doesn’t want to fix it at all,” she said.

 

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