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A GLIMPSE OF SCULPTURE AND HEATHER

Gordon Cambron, left, and Michael Kilpatrick show woodwork. (THE PILOT/BILL LUNDQUIST).
Gordon Cambron, left, and Michael Kilpatrick show woodwork. (THE PILOT/BILL LUNDQUIST).

By BILL LUNDQUIST

PILOT STAFF WRITER

CRESCENT CITY – The new Elk Valley Rancheria community center, a wood sculpture studio, and a heather nursery were included on Wednesday's Hospitality Tours.

More Antiques

The day's tour centered on Crescent City, but tour participants assembled at Pacific Coast Antique Mall in Harbor.

They were greeted by the sad announcement that Hospitality Tours Director Jan Norwood's husband Bill had died the night before.

Bill was a frequent participant on the tours, and the Norwoods were remembered with a minute of silence before lunch.

Norwood said she had planned to lead Wednesday's tour, but wanted participants to have fun, not think of her grief. She stayed long enough to give directions and send the tour on its way.

Lynn Truman, owner of Pacific Coast Antique Mall, said her store now features 318 vendors.

As a result, she said, she opened an annex for consignments in the English Village behind Mattie's restaurant. Truman invited tour participants to visit the new shop on their way to Crescent City.

She also plans to open a third store: a warehouse auction place to sell items that haven't sold at the other stores.

Truman also explained plans for the Kris Kringle Market on Dec. 12 with 40 vendors, ethnic dance groups, and the lighting of all of Brookings and Harbor.

"There's always been a division between Brookings, Harbor and the port," she said.

"This year there will be no division. It will all be lit," she said. "It's about how a town divided became a town united."

Elk Valley Rancheria

Tour participants then drove south to see what a small group of Tolowa and Yurok peoples had accomplished since uniting.

Only a block from the Elk Valley Casino, the $2.2 million community center was dedicated Aug. 9.

The building now houses tribal offices, but also a museum, library, and tribal council chambers/conference room that are all open to the public.

To reach the community center, drive south through Crescent City past the S-curves to the stoplight at Elk Valley Road. Turn left on the road, drive past the mill and turn right on Howland Hill Road. The center is on the left, a few blocks up the road.

Center librarian Wanda Green and Rancheria marketing director Nancy McClaflin guided the group through the facility.

The museum houses a traditional canoe carved two years ago by George Wilson of Klamath, Calif., who also made the drum and bow and arrows on display. Green explained that the Tolowa and Yurok peoples use square drums.

She also pointed out photographs from the early 1900s donated to the museum by her mother-in-law.

One shows a Yurok woman in a ceremonial dress made of nauset and pine nut shells.

Dolls wear traditional woven basket caps and have the three tattoo marks on the chin that were a sign of wealth.

The marks are also visible on the people in a large wooden sculpture outside the conference room, carved in 1996 by Lavertta Harper.

Like the rest of the building, the conference room has large stained glass windows, made by Kelly's Studio in Medford, featuring native American scenes and abstract designs. Several chandeliers with Western designs hang from thick laminated wooden beams.

The council chambers also feature up-to-date technology, with acoustic sound panels, Dell computer monitors at each council seat, and a large screen for Powerpoint presentations.

The tribal council is currently made up of five women and four men. Each of the 100 tribal members is welcome at the meetings.

McClaflin said the building was built with profits from the casino and other rancheria enterprises like the Del Norte Golf Course and Tsunami Lanes.

As soon as details on a land contract can be finalized, said McClaflin, work will begin on a new destination resort on the south end of Crescent City near U.S. Highway 101.

It will feature a 154-room hotel and an 18-hole Arnold Palmer golf course. The casino will also move to the new site.

McClaflin said the resort will bring 200 new jobs to the area. When applicants are equally qualified, preference goes to Native Americans.

McClaflin said the casino has been operating eight years. For the first six, all profits went into tribal enterprises.

Since then, she said, a per capita program has distributed some profits quarterly to all tribal members. Funds are held in trust for the children.

McClaflin said the tribe also donates money to youth sports teams, a fish hatchery, a skateboard park, and most school functions.

The tour group was served a buffet lunch in the bingo room of the casino.

Functional Sculpture

As tour participants drove back down Elk Valley Road, they stopped across from the mill at Functional Sculpture.

There, Michael Kilpatrick and apprentice Gordon Cambron showed off functional sculptures such as a table made from the burl of a curly redwood tree.

Kilpatrick said most of what he makes are custom orders. Many are also fashioned from a mosaic of woods.

Kilpatrick said he will formally open his retail outlet at the end of the month.

Heather Nursery

Tour participants took Parkway Drive north of town to Rosie's Backyard, where Rosie and David Leabery specialize in heather and native plants.

They can be reached online at rosiesbackyard @earthlink.net, or at (707) 464-3873.

See Tour, Page 2BContinued from Page 1B

The Leaberys moved to Crescent City in 1999 from Santa Barbara, where David was the head gardener at that city's botanical garden.

Here, they offer 140 varieties of heather, along with native plants and rhododendrons.

Rosie said they go on their own buying trips to small growers in the areas around Portland, so they can obtain what people request.

Heather is not only drought resistant but, more importantly in this area, deer resistant, she said.

They propagate the plants in greenhouses where the heat, ventilation and watering are automatically controlled.

Still, said Rosie, "We had a lot of luck propagating outside last year. Some of the plants inside rotted."

Future events

Hospitality Tours will tour Brookings attractions again on Nov. 19, while the Dec. 17 program may feature day and evening tours.

Call Norwood at (541) 469-4909 for information, or to reserve a spot.Continued from Page 1B

The Leaberys moved to Crescent City in 1999 from Santa Barbara, where David was the head gardener at that city's botanical garden.

Here, they offer 140 varieties of heather, along with native plants and rhododendrons.

Rosie said they go on their own buying trips to small growers in the areas around Portland, so they can obtain what people request.

Heather is not only drought resistant but, more importantly in this area, deer resistant, she said.

They propagate the plants in greenhouses where the heat, ventilation and watering are automatically controlled.

Still, said Rosie, "We had a lot of luck propagating outside last year. Some of the plants inside rotted."

Future events

Hospitality Tours will tour Brookings attractions again on Nov. 19, while the Dec. 17 program may feature day and evening tours.

Call Norwood at (541) 469-4909 for information, or to reserve a spot.

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